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Resources of Interest: Journal of Cognitive Historiography

This new journal—for which one of NAASR’s founders serves as a senior editor—might be of interest to NAASR members. From the publisher’s website:

The Journal of Cognitive Historiography is the first peer-reviewed publication for research concerned with the interactions between history, historiography, and/or archaeology and cognitive theories.

The journal provides a forum for scholars from a range of different disciplines, and draws on diverse approaches to examine how cognitive theorizing may support historical research, and vice versa. Examples of areas of research include the relationship between universalizing theories and specific historical events, the mental worlds and functions of historical agents, and the transmission of ideas and/or practices across time and place.

The editors welcome contributions from all periods and on all topics of historical and archaeological study, as well as those raising diverse methodological or theoretical issues. On the cognitive side, these may include, but are not limited to, those found in the disciplines of cognitive psychology, cognitive anthropology, cognitive sociology and neuroscience, as well as evolutionary theorizing.

You can find out more at the publisher’s website here.

Annual NAASR Reception, Sponsored by Equinox Publishing

The annual NAASR reception in San Diego will be held on Friday November 21 from 6:00-8:00 PM at a very cool bar called Analog (801 5th Avenue, Gaslamp district). We’ll have beer, wine, and some great hors d’oeuvres. Many thanks to Equinox Publishing for sponsoring the event!

Note: unlike last year we won’t have an open bar but instead will pass out drink tickets; there should be enough for everyone to get a couple of drinks.

 

Announcement: Job Ad

This job ad might be of interest to NAASR members; contact Robert Yelle (robertyelle at hotmail dot com) if you have any questions.

NAASR Note: IAHR Extended Deadline

The IAHR September e-Bulletin is out. You can find it here.

Of particular note is the extended deadline for panel proposals for the 2015 meeting in Erfurt—the new deadline is 15 December 2014.

Also worth mentioning is the proposal to change the name of the IAHR, something which will be discussed at Erfurt next year. See the e-Bulletin for more details.

The Study of Religion as an Analytical Discipline Workshop 2014

San-Diego-skyline-from-Pt1The program for this year’s Study of Religion as an Analytical Discipline (SORAAAD) workshop—focusing on comparison—has now been announced:

In its fourth year, toward better design and deployment of comparative work in studies of religion, the SORAAAD workshop will focus on the act of comparison itself. How has comparison served as a method in the study of religion? How do we design research projects wherein data vary across space, time, or conceptual valence? How do we structure comparative studies in order to identify and mitigate hegemonic assumptions? How do we relate deep studies of small populations to larger populations and discourses? How transferable are the insights and mechanics developed within different settings? Addressing these and related questions, SORAAAD seeks not only to recover subfields from essentialism, but also to foster new inter- and intra-disciplinary development.

Speakers include John Kloppenborg, David Frankfurter, Paul C. Johnson, Kathryn Lofton, Jamel Velji, Margo Kitts, Jens Kreinath, and Michael Houseman.

You can find the full program here.

NAASR Note: Journal for the Cognitive Science of Religion

JCSRAlong with Pascal Boyer and Armin W. Geertz, NAASR co-founder Luther H. Martin is one of the editors of a new journal, the Journal for the Cognitive Science of Religion. 

Journal for the Cognitive Science of Religion is the official journal of the International Association for the Cognitive Science of Religion (IACSR). The Association was founded in 2006 and since then has sponsored a number of international collaborative projects and biennial conferences. A subscription to the journal is included in membership.

The cognitive science of religion is a burgeoning field that finds itself in the center of cross-disciplinary research. Cognition is understood in a variety of ways from bottom-up to top-down models and theories. New insights into cognition, culture and religion are being discovered, new ways of doing research are being established and new methodologies and technologies are being used in the cognitive science of religion. The number of scholars and scientists working in this exciting field are expanding exponentially, and the journal provides a cutting-edge publication channel for this field.

You can find more information at the publisher’s website here.

NAASR Note: The Problem of the Mystic East

The Bulletin for the Study of Religion blog has a post on “The Problem of the Mystic Eastmystic-east” that might be of interest to NAASR members.