Dedicated to historical, critical, and social scientific approaches to the study of religion, as well as a relentlessly reflexive critique of the theories, methods, and categories used in such study.

Books of Interest: Capitalizing Religion

Craig Martin, Capitalizing Religion: Ideology and the Opiate of the Bourgeoisie (Bloomsbury 2014).

Talk of ‘spirituality’ and ‘individual religion’ is proliferating both in popular discourse and scholarly works. Increasingly people claim to be ‘spiritual but not religious,’ or to prefer ‘individual religion’ to ‘organized religion.’ Scholars have for decades noted the phenomenon – primarily within the middle class – of individuals picking and choosing elements from among various religious traditions, forming their own religion or spirituality for themselves.

While the topics of ‘spirituality’ and ‘individual religion’ are regularly treated as self-evident by the media and even some scholars of religion, Capitalizing Religion provides one of the first critical analyses of the phenomenon, arguing that these recent forms of spirituality are in many cases linked to capitalist ideology and consumer practices. Examining cases such as Eckhart Tolle’s The Power of Now, and Karen Berg’s God Wears Lipstick, Craig Martin ultimately argues that so-called ‘individual religion’ is a religion of the status quo or, more critically, ‘an opiate of the bourgeoisie.’

Table of Contents

Introduction
Part 1: Religion, Capitalism,and Social Theory
1. ‘Individuality is zero’
2. Theorizing ‘Individual Religion’
3. Our ‘Religion’ of the Status Quo
Part 2: The Opiate of the Bourgeoisie
4. Quietism: The Empire’s Gospel
5. Consumerism: The Fashionable Hijab
6. Productivity: The New Protestant Work Ethic
7. Individualism: A Capital Theodicy
Afterword: Things at the Disposal of Society
Bibliography
Index

Books of Interest: Sects and Stats

James R. Lewis, Sects and Stats: Overturning the Conventional Wisdom about Cult Members (Equinox 2014)

A major, perhaps the major, focus of early research on New Religious Movements (NRMs) was on the people who joined. Most of the field’s pioneer researchers were sociologists. However, the profile of NRM members had changed substantially by the twenty-first century – changes largely missed because the great majority of current NRM specialists are not quantitatively oriented. Sects & Stats aims to overturn the conventional wisdom by drawing on current quantitative data from two sources: questionnaire research on select NRMs and relevant national census data collected by Anglophone countries. Sects & Stats also makes a strong argument for the use of longitudinal methods in studying alternative religions. Additionally, through case studies drawn from the author’s own research projects over the years, readers will be brought into a conversation about some of the issues involved in how to conduct such research.

Resources of Interest: Journal of Cognitive Historiography

This new journal—for which one of NAASR’s founders serves as a senior editor—might be of interest to NAASR members. From the publisher’s website:

The Journal of Cognitive Historiography is the first peer-reviewed publication for research concerned with the interactions between history, historiography, and/or archaeology and cognitive theories.

The journal provides a forum for scholars from a range of different disciplines, and draws on diverse approaches to examine how cognitive theorizing may support historical research, and vice versa. Examples of areas of research include the relationship between universalizing theories and specific historical events, the mental worlds and functions of historical agents, and the transmission of ideas and/or practices across time and place.

The editors welcome contributions from all periods and on all topics of historical and archaeological study, as well as those raising diverse methodological or theoretical issues. On the cognitive side, these may include, but are not limited to, those found in the disciplines of cognitive psychology, cognitive anthropology, cognitive sociology and neuroscience, as well as evolutionary theorizing.

You can find out more at the publisher’s website here.

Annual NAASR Reception, Sponsored by Equinox Publishing

The annual NAASR reception in San Diego will be held on Friday November 21 from 6:00-8:00 PM at a very cool bar called Analog (801 5th Avenue, Gaslamp district). We’ll have beer, wine, and some great hors d’oeuvres. Many thanks to Equinox Publishing for sponsoring the event!

Note: unlike last year we won’t have an open bar but instead will pass out drink tickets; there should be enough for everyone to get a couple of drinks.

 

Announcement: Job Ad

This job ad might be of interest to NAASR members; contact Robert Yelle (robertyelle at hotmail dot com) if you have any questions.

NAASR Note: IAHR Extended Deadline

The IAHR September e-Bulletin is out. You can find it here.

Of particular note is the extended deadline for panel proposals for the 2015 meeting in Erfurt—the new deadline is 15 December 2014.

Also worth mentioning is the proposal to change the name of the IAHR, something which will be discussed at Erfurt next year. See the e-Bulletin for more details.

Books of Interest: Textbook Gods

Bengt-Ove Andreassen and James R. Lewis (editors), Textbook Gods: Genre, Text and Teaching Religious Studies (Equinox 2014).

In recent years there has been a renewed interest in textbooks, partly because they have maintained their position as an important genre. Not too many years ago – and perhaps currently as well – many considered textbooks outdated or archaic compared with technological advances such as the Internet and different kinds of educational software. Despite these changes, textbooks for school subjects and for academic studies continue to be in demand. Textbooks seem to constitute a genre in which established truths are conveyed, and may thus represent stable forces in a world of flux and rapid changes.

Textbook Gods offers perspectives on representations of religion and religions in textbooks. The contributions emerge from different contexts, ranging from European countries, to North America, Japan and Australia.

NAASR members can receive 25% off the retail price using the code Textbook when ordering from http://www.equinoxpub.com; valid until the end of October 2014.

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